Why the Iranians Hate Us: the Coup of 1953

Why the Iranians Hate Us: the Coup of 1953

Troops surround the Iranian parliament after the coup

by Timothy Chilman email: ephedrasa@hotmail.com Early in the 20th century, the weak and ineffectual Mozzafar-ad-Din Shah Qajar, ruler of Persia, was troubled. Declining revenues and royal extravagance caused financial woes. The Shah rapidly exhausted two large loans from Russia, partly on travel to Europe. Secret revolutionary societies sprang up. Widespread strikes and other protests aroused the fear that the military would join the opposition, requiring concession. On August 5, 1906, the Shah signed the Electoral Law of Persia, creating an...
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Did Hitler Get Away?

Did Hitler Get Away?

Did he escape his bunker in April, 1945?

<There was a shorter article about this here, not long ago. I’d already done the research for this when it appeared. I was going to wait a while to give people a chance to forget the shorter one, but the recently-released book, The Grey Fox: the Escape of Adolf Hitler, soon to be made into a film, is about the same thing, and it forced my hand.> by Timothy Chilman email: timothychilman@yahoo.com   The story is well-known. By April 29,...
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Poor, Befuddled Ronald Reagan and All That White Powder

Poor, Befuddled Ronald Reagan and All That White Powder

This poor, confused, old geezer got himself into SO MUCH TROUBLE!

by Timothy Chilman email: timothychilman@yahoo.com In Nicaragua in the 1980s, the counter-revolutionaries – contras – comprised men who were National Guardsmen under the dictator, Somoza, and peasants opposed to the agrarian reform of the government of the Sandinista Front. The Central Intelligence Agency began to feed, clothe, arm, and supervise the contras in Honduras under National Security Decision Directive 17, which President Ronald Reagan signed in December 1981. Its ostensible purpose was to prevent the flow of armaments from Nicaragua...
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Defeated by Inferior Technology

Defeated by Inferior Technology

The U.S. military is actually a bit crap.

by Timothy Chilman email: timothychilman@yahoo.com “We were defeated by one thing only – by the inferior science of our enemies. I repeat – by the inferior science of our enemies.” from Supremacy, by Arthur C. Clarke. INTRODUCTION Between the end of the Vietnam War and the invasion of Grenada in 1983, nobody considered the U.S. military unstoppable, but times change. U.S. defense spending dwarfs that of the next six biggest spenders together. U.S. military hardware is considered the best. The...
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A Tale of Terrorism by the U.S. Government

A Tale of Terrorism by the U.S. Government

Fidel Castro, the target of the operation.

By Timothy Chilman email: timothychilman@yahoo.com   Military action by the US against Fidel Castro’s Cuba was first suggested by President Eisenhower. The Cold War was at its peak, and the downing of Gary Powers’ U2 had occurred not long before. Eisenhower wanted to invade Cuba immediately before President Kennedy’s inauguration. On January 3 1961, at a meeting with the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and others, he said he would take action against Castro before the inauguration if...
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How the United States Narrowly Missed a Coup

How the United States Narrowly Missed a Coup

General Smedley Darlington Butler

by Timothy Chilman email: timothychilman@yahoo.com The term “conspiracy theory” did not enter the Oxford English Dictionary until 1997, but it was used as early as January 27, 1877 by lawyer David Dudley Field in The Fitchburg Sentinel in support of his view that the Republicans had stolen the 1876 election from Samuel Tilden. General Smedley Darlington Butler Retired Marine Corps General Smedley Darlington Butler (1881-1940) was described as a “foolish conspiracy theorist” after blowing the whistle on a fascist coup...
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They Were Shooting Flying Fish: the Gulf of Tonkin Incident

They Were Shooting Flying Fish: the Gulf of Tonkin Incident

The USS Maddox engages North Vietnamese P-4 patrol boats

by Timothy Chilman email: timothychilman@yahoo.com Tonkin, Đông Kinh in Vietnamese, means “Eastern Capital.” On 10 August, 1964, the Southeast Asia (Gulf of Tonkin) Resolution was approved by the House of Representatives by 416 votes to nil after 40 minutes of debate, and the Senate by a vote of 88 to 2 after nine hours of debate. The resolution granted President Lyndon Baines Johnson the right to use military force without a declaration of war. Senators Morse and Gruening argued that...
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